Whispers, marches, and science

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I’m not marching for science on April 22. I think it’s a waste of time, energy, and somewhat hypocrytical.

March meme

Meme posted on the Facebook page “March for Science” on March 31, 2017

The Facebook page “March for Science” posted the meme to the right. “Science is unbound by borders, working at its best when ideas flow freely among peoples and nations,” is a beautiful thought, but it’s not reality, and President Trump is not to blame for that fact. The squelching of scientific free speech came long before he took office, and it came from within the scientific community itself.

Let me comment on one issue I am aware of personally, although I’m sure it is just one of many — the issue of the mythological climate consensus. (Oh, I’m in trouble now, aren’t I?)

The pursuit of science is the pursuit of knowledge by observation, creation of hypotheses, testing of hypotheses, more observation, and tweaking of hypotheses, etc. It is a cyclical process. Only when a hypothesis has been tested over and over in ways that are replicable and it is strenthened by replication can that hypothesis graduate to status of theory. Even theories can eventually be proven incorrect.

Somehow the idea that climate change is caused by an increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been elevated beyond theory to some new belief system that is not allowed to be questioned. Anyone who proposes an alternate hypothesis or questions the quality of the data and experiments gets blacklisted, name-called, and pushed to the back of the bus, or worse, pushed off the bus altogether — figuratively speaking, of course. How is this behavior by other scientists exemplary a free exchange of ideas?

Many of us who are willing to look into potential alternative causes of climate change speak quietly amongst ourselves in hushed tones because we fear the kind of vehement judgement that our more outspoken counterparts have faced. One example is Judith Curry who testified in front of the House Science Committee on March 29. Here is the link to her oral comments in her own words. If you weren’t aware that some scientists question the consensus, reading her statement might prove quite enlightening.

Personally, I like to read everything I can find about alternative explanations to most super-popular theories because I am proud to be a scientist in the truest sense of the word. I like to keep an open mind, and it would be wonderful if those of us who do could speak above a whisper when we meet.

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  1. Be a good scientist. - frontporchweather
    […] sit on the sidelines of the battle over whether man-made climate change is “settled science.” I read studies and […]